Category Archives: fiction

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Though the book starts out a bit confusing, with characters not clearly identified in a way that made sense to me, the story did still draw me in, going back and forth between 1941 and present day. Four women comprise The High Tide Club, a bunch of single friends ages 14-19, in 1941; three are white and one is black, which is significant both of the time period as well as later in the book. These women face adversity both in the past and in present day; the book does evolve and ultimately do a good job with character development, reeling in the reader with facts slowly doled out each chapter.

In summary, a lawyer named Brooke is hired by a 99 year old woman, Josephine, to save her property from developers and the state, after she passes. Along the way, we meet members of Brooke’s family, as well as the descendants of the High Tide Club, whom Josephine wants to bequest her property. In addition, Brooke begins to be wooed by a former mentor and a past relationship also turns up at the same time, which causes some confusion for all involved. What seems to initially be a straightforward story of legal drama and righting some wrongs, turns into a multifaceted, layered affair with twists and turnabouts few will see coming.

Though most likely considered general summer fiction, there is so much more in this story. Mystery, deceit, murder, rape, racism, and romance are all intertwined with so many details, you will want to savor each page, reading slowly to capture all of the nuances and anticipate what direction the story will take. Though some storylines are predictable, the majority are not and might surprise the reader a little, making the book even more captivating and thought provoking. I stayed up late finishing it, just couldn’t put it down. Definitely recommend for book clubs, and I already told my mom to read it, so we can talk about it.

 

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Filed under fiction, Historical fiction, mystery, romance

Every Note Played

9942F152-5290-4C79-A40C-26BAA104F581Every Note Played is a heart wrenching story about a couple who lost their way but not their respect, for one another. Karina and Richard are both musicians who fell in love over the piano. Karina plays jazz and Richard is more of a classical purist, yet they are able to find commonalities even beyond their instruments. Over time though, secrets and insecurities creep into their marriage, ultimately contributing to its demise. This aspect of the story is not unique or new; the added dimension is that Richard acquired ALS about xx years after the divorce, and Karina becomes his caretaker. They each have to face their own internal demons as well as make peace with how they treated one another.
As Richard’s disease progresses, he begins to develop humility. Karina rediscovers long lost confidence. The two figure out a way to live together while also facing Richard’s certain death sentence. Their ability to find a way to communicate and even somewhat reconcile make for a compelling read. Side characters include their college age daughter, Richard’s caretaker and Karina’s best friend; each one offers insight into the character’s development and move the story along.
Overall, though not an upbeat book, it is honest and informative. It was hard to put down, as I wanted to find out what would happen next. The emotional complexities made the book compelling. I also have relatives with this disease and learning about what they go through was difficult to process, yet I appreciated learning more about the disease. Though fiction, the author did a tremendous amount of research and I think that what it is in the book is an accurate depiction of some one with ALS. She also shared information at the end about new trials, which offer hope to those afflicted. Strongly recommended.
(Received an early copy of the book from Net Galley and have provided an impartial review.)

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The Hideaway

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My bookclub read The Hideaway by Lauren Denton and though the group was mixed on their opinions, I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Sara, a woman in her late 20’s/early 30’s inherits an old house that belonged to her late grandmother, Maggie. Throughout the novel, we learn about each of their lives, the hits and misses, romances and relationships. Sara thought she knew all about her grandmother but as an adult she was able to discover The Hideaway a side of her few knew had existed. It is a bittersweet novel, as Sara realized Maggie was so much more than just her grandmother. It is hard to describe what seems like an obvious observation, that a younger Maggie had a full and extensive life before Sara or even Sara’s mother, was born. This realization give Sara the courage to trust her herself to make risky decisions about her own life. She had been living in a sheltered existence, avoiding reality while pretending that she was happy and fulfilled.

The Hideaway will make you think about the people in your life, past and present, and wonder how well you know them. It made me wish I could go back and ask my grandparents more questions about their earlier lives. Written well, going back and forth between the two time periods, readers will find themselves drawn into both stories and I think, find the end satisfying.

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Talk to the Paw

86F21959-299B-4B4C-8186-F7DF4CD3C286.jpegJamie’s cat MacGyver is super intuitive to her moods and feelings, more than the typical cat. In addition, he is pretty smart, able to figure out how to escape his house to explore the neighborhood where they moved to. The book follows Jamie’s year without a man, while she figures out her life after deciding to have a career change. She came to realize that she was putting her needs and interests behind those of the men she dated and lost herself in the process. The story occurs over the course of a year, and we get to experience her ups and downs along the way. She makes new friends and discoveries, allowing her to find her path and contentment along the way. Definitely a good book for cat fans, as well as those who like books with a romantic plot line.

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Disturbing Historical Fiction

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Before We Were Yours

After reading the short blurb about Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate, I was highly intrigued about the plot and the writing. I was fascinated by the idea of a children’s home stealing kids and selling them off to the highest bidder. However, once I began reading, I was unprepared for how distressing main character Rill’s story would turn out to be. I actually could not finish it, knowing that horrible fates likely awaited Rill and her siblings. Perhaps I am too shallow, but reading the book and anticipating what would be happening to the kids, as well as the torture the parents felt over losing their children, was not an option for me. As a parent, I had great difficulty reading about subjects such as children being separated from the only family they know, about a child being abusively punished for bed wetting, about lies being told while children were used as pawns.

So I do recommend the book for those interested in realistic fiction, who have a stronger stomach than me. I think there are many well written pieces and the author does a commendable job outlining the plot, using a mystery as a good device to share this past atrocity. Friends and my book club read the book and though they thought it was upsetting, were glad they read it.

 

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Filed under fiction, Historical fiction, mysteries, mystery, Uncategorized

Hope and Redemption, a Tale of Self Discovery

Between the TidesEDB599BB-B5AE-415A-8A65-FA72C854B331While on vacation, I decided to read Between the Tides. However, this is not your typical beach read; instead, it is thought provoking and compelling. The main character, Cappy (nickname from Catherine), is 30 years old and facing life as a recent orphan, most recently losing her father within the past year. He requested his ashes be strewn in the river of her childhood home, a town she lived in till she was 12 and tragedy struck. The idea of returning to Seaboro 18 years later is overwhelming and beyond comprehension. However, after determining she must in fact do it, she and a friend (former boyfriend Forrest) take the trip, a five hour car ride away.

While in Seaboro, Cappy discovers she did not know her father nearly as well as she initially believed, learning about secrets and aspects of his life she did not foresee or fathom. She also faces her own identify crisis, coming to terms with the incident that drove the family from town. As an adult, Cappy has kept just about everyone at arm’s length, and those walls are forced to crumble upon learning information about her past and even her present situation. In less than a week, Cappy must make unexpected, life altering decisions regarding her own future, as well as those she loves.

Henry’s writing is well done; the sentences flow easily and she integrates prose and quotes effortlessly into the text. Cappy’s father speaks to the concept that one’s life is a story and that one can learn about your own life from different published tales as well. This lesson had been lost on Cappy for the past 18 years, but she comes to an understanding of him and his intentions as the plot unfolds. There are some plot elements that wil not surprise the reader and will actually validate the feelings about the characters; I think readers will find the storyline well constructed and appropriately designed. The book is left open to consider a sequel with some of the side characters, should Henry wish to explore their stories as much as Cappy’s.

Side note: I met the author in summer 2017 when discussing one of her newer books. She is an engaging speaker and captivated the audience with her authentic tone and stories about her family and childhood. I plan on reading Henry’s other books and sharing them with friends.

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Mistaken Identity

 

I FOUND YOU 9781501154591 Is he a good guy or a bad guy? ‘Frank’ shows up on English coast one day, with only the clothes on his back, no memory of who he is or how he got there. A woman named Alice finds him and takes him in, much to the chagrin of her family and closest friend. Miles away in London, Lilly an Ukrainian immigrant reports her newlywed husband is missing. Knowing no one, she has to figure out who she can trust to learn what happened to him. Decades earlier, a family goes on a seaside vacation in a small coastal community with unforeseen results. These three separate plot lines comprise the story of I Found You. A slow build up leads to an explosive explanation about how the three distinct tales intersect and provide all the answers.

Jewell effortlessly takes the reader back and forth, from present day to 1993. She paints descriptive pictures of each character, allowing for a full image to form and opinions to emerge. As the book unfolds, the two male characters are introduced, and one is likable while the other is not. With the story bouncing back and forth from the past to the present, and ‘Frank’s’ identity slowly forming shape, the reader is left to guess which of the two men he really is.

Highly recommend this suspenseful novel. My book club is going to read it, and I can’t wait to hear their opinions.

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