Tag Archives: women

759D04A6-82C6-4D0F-A791-EBB959DC2D17

Though the book starts out a bit confusing, with characters not clearly identified in a way that made sense to me, the story did still draw me in, going back and forth between 1941 and present day. Four women comprise The High Tide Club, a bunch of single friends ages 14-19, in 1941; three are white and one is black, which is significant both of the time period as well as later in the book. These women face adversity both in the past and in present day; the book does evolve and ultimately do a good job with character development, reeling in the reader with facts slowly doled out each chapter.

In summary, a lawyer named Brooke is hired by a 99 year old woman, Josephine, to save her property from developers and the state, after she passes. Along the way, we meet members of Brooke’s family, as well as the descendants of the High Tide Club, whom Josephine wants to bequest her property. In addition, Brooke begins to be wooed by a former mentor and a past relationship also turns up at the same time, which causes some confusion for all involved. What seems to initially be a straightforward story of legal drama and righting some wrongs, turns into a multifaceted, layered affair with twists and turnabouts few will see coming.

Though most likely considered general summer fiction, there is so much more in this story. Mystery, deceit, murder, rape, racism, and romance are all intertwined with so many details, you will want to savor each page, reading slowly to capture all of the nuances and anticipate what direction the story will take. Though some storylines are predictable, the majority are not and might surprise the reader a little, making the book even more captivating and thought provoking. I stayed up late finishing it, just couldn’t put it down. Definitely recommend for book clubs, and I already told my mom to read it, so we can talk about it.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction, Historical fiction, mystery, romance

Hope and Redemption, a Tale of Self Discovery

Between the TidesEDB599BB-B5AE-415A-8A65-FA72C854B331While on vacation, I decided to read Between the Tides. However, this is not your typical beach read; instead, it is thought provoking and compelling. The main character, Cappy (nickname from Catherine), is 30 years old and facing life as a recent orphan, most recently losing her father within the past year. He requested his ashes be strewn in the river of her childhood home, a town she lived in till she was 12 and tragedy struck. The idea of returning to Seaboro 18 years later is overwhelming and beyond comprehension. However, after determining she must in fact do it, she and a friend (former boyfriend Forrest) take the trip, a five hour car ride away.

While in Seaboro, Cappy discovers she did not know her father nearly as well as she initially believed, learning about secrets and aspects of his life she did not foresee or fathom. She also faces her own identify crisis, coming to terms with the incident that drove the family from town. As an adult, Cappy has kept just about everyone at arm’s length, and those walls are forced to crumble upon learning information about her past and even her present situation. In less than a week, Cappy must make unexpected, life altering decisions regarding her own future, as well as those she loves.

Henry’s writing is well done; the sentences flow easily and she integrates prose and quotes effortlessly into the text. Cappy’s father speaks to the concept that one’s life is a story and that one can learn about your own life from different published tales as well. This lesson had been lost on Cappy for the past 18 years, but she comes to an understanding of him and his intentions as the plot unfolds. There are some plot elements that wil not surprise the reader and will actually validate the feelings about the characters; I think readers will find the storyline well constructed and appropriately designed. The book is left open to consider a sequel with some of the side characters, should Henry wish to explore their stories as much as Cappy’s.

Side note: I met the author in summer 2017 when discussing one of her newer books. She is an engaging speaker and captivated the audience with her authentic tone and stories about her family and childhood. I plan on reading Henry’s other books and sharing them with friends.

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction, romance

Light read for the foodie fan

IMG_2188by Kimberly Stuart, addresses the dilemma many women and men make, choosing one’s career or a relationship. Charlie is a pastry chef trying to establish herself in a famous NY restaurant under the tutelage of a famous baker, but no matter how hard she tries, she is not able to get the approval of her superior. When the opportunity arises for her to run the kitchen Continue reading

Leave a comment

July 11, 2017 · 1:12 am

Tracy Ewens Writes Relatable Romantic Fiction

Readers who like romance with modern, real life circumstances will want to read Tracy Ewens’ Love Story series. As of this writing, there are eight books in the series. Ewens introduces a character in one book and features him or her in another. She has both men and women as the main characters, exploring reasons why a relationship will or won’t work. Though there are some formulaic aspects in the series as we can realistically assume the two love interests will work through their obstacles to find happiness together, Ewens manages to make each story fresh. One way she accomplishes this feat is by having many of the storylines take place at different locations, such as a farm, restaurant, city, beach, college, football arena, political venue and more. The characters have a variety of jobs too, which means Ewens appears to do extensive amounts of research to get it right. Their occupations range from chef to bartender to politician to actor to photographer to computer programmer to farmer. Ewens also represents people at different stages of life, which allows the reader to find someone to relate to.

I eagerly await Ewens’ next book, as I am sure it will hold my attention while also teach me something!

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction, romance

A Mother’s Promise

IMG_2154A Mother’s Promise is one of the most difficult, yet well written books, I have read in years. Hepworth has a great talent and accurately captures the essence of a mother / daughter relationship with finesse and compassion. The main character, Alice, is diagnosed with ovarian cancer and has to figure out a way to take care of herself an her 15 year old daughter who suffers from severe social anxiety. Unfortunately, there is virtually no extended family support, so we are introduced to Alice’s primary nurse Kate and a social worker, Sonja, who is also assigned to the case. Though the story centers on Alice’s condition, each person has her own story to tell, and we are fortunate to be introduced to each one’s tale.

As a mom to a teenage daughter, I found it hard to read, because the topic is so difficult to process. Alice’s diagnosis is every mother’s fear and I did not want to consider the ‘what if’ that resonates throughout the book. However, I am so glad I persevered, because it is such a solid piece of fiction. The ending provides resolution and at the same time, keeps the door open for the next stage in the character’s lives. I highly recommend this book to anyone who finds real life books compelling. The story has a few predicable elements, but there are also plenty of unexpected moments, both positive and negative, like real life. I have already told friends about it and will continue to read Hepworth’s novels, as they make me think and help me slow down and appreciate the people I love the most.

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction

New Mystery Series

Just discovered this series. If you like reading about strong female lead characters who have a habit of unintentionally finding dead bodies, then try to solve the crime, this is your series. It is sort of a mix of Stephanie Plum and Hannah Swensen, to name two other similar female leads (authors Evanovich and Fluke, respectively).

I liked the pace, the who unknown, the side cast, and the twists. Book one is out now, book two will be released in early June 2016.  I liked Swimsuit Body more, but Bones and Roses is good too. I also recommend reading in order, so the side stories make sense and don’t ruin a previous book.

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction, mysteries, mystery, romance

Baby, Not Tonight

image

Feeling awful after a nasty breakup of a five year relationship while living in Paris, France, Milla returns to the US to start over. She is a chef and finds work in a kitchen that offers stable hours and salary, if not the glamour of a five-star restaurant. While she figures out how to begin again, both personally and professionally, she is also stuck in the past, harping on why her relationship failed. To help her move forward, her best friend and co-worker Jake, encourages her to meet someone new, to get on the horse, so to speak. And so enters Hunter, a handsome single man with his own pile of baggage. The two begin a relationship based on mutual attraction and half-truths, and when reality hits, it hits Milla hard. With her lack of coping skills, she does not know how to handle her growing feelings toward Hunter or his evasion about significant members of his past.

Tied into the relationship story, are some noteworthy side characters, including the afore mentioned Jake, as well as Hunter’s brother, mother and best friend, Ivy. There are also some characters who are briefly mentioned but not developed, such as Milla’s family, which does create a little hole in the plot. Jake also has his own side story and though interesting, I found it a little distracting. Overall, the main romantic story and how Milla and Hunter figure out their feelings for one another is a solid read. There are good hints for communicating with someone you care about too. If you are looking for a romantic comedy, b/c there are a few laugh out loud moments in the story, with some depth too, then Baby, Not Tonight is worth checking out.

(A copy of the book was provided in exchange for an unbiased review.)

2 Comments

Filed under fiction, romance